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Many of our events are video-recorded. You can see a list of available videos on our website. If you subscribe to the ISSI YouTube channel, you will be notified when new videos are available.


Fall 2018


Wednesday, September 26 I 12:00-1:30pm

Center for Research on Social Change Colloquia Series:

Moving Beyond Recruitment: Supporting and Retaining Black Male Teachers

Travis J. Bristol, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education, UC Berkeley

While policy makers and practitioners call for increasing the number of Black male teachers, researchers find that this subgroup has the highest rate of turnover. Despite ongoing local and state teacher diversity recruitment efforts, there is a paucity of research that examines Black male teachers’ school-based experiences and decisions to stay or leave their schools. To fill this gap in the literature, this talk will examine Black male teachers’ experiences in organizations.

Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way

Co-sponsored by the Center for Race and Gender.


Wednesday, October 17 I 12:00-1:30pm

Center for Research on Social Change Colloquia Series:

Mobility, Expulsion and Claims to Home: Migrant Organizing in an Era of Deportation and Dispossession

Monisha Das Gupta, Professor of Ethnic Studies and Women’s Studies, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

The virulence and pervasiveness of immigration enforcement have fueled migrants to organize in heterogeneous ways. My research about and activism in the movement during the last eight years have evolved into an engagement with a strain of anti-deportation organizing which takes up the cause of the most indefensible of immigrants and refugees -- those labeled criminal aliens. Non-citizens, who are branded with this label, are both legal permanent residents and undocumented.  Ninety-two percent of all migrants caught in the dragnet of interior enforcement in 2016 were categorized as “criminal aliens.” What activists term “crimmigration” has become the most effective tool to remove migrants from the interior.

  In this talk, I examine the relationship among mobility, forced removals, and claims to space by analyzing how high school-age members of Khmer Girls in Action (KGA) in Long Beach interrogate the school to prison to deportation pipeline. They link the criminalization of Khmer refugees to the legacies of United States’ wars in southeast Asia and the failures of the US refugee resettlement program. The “refugee voice,” which youth leaders learn to use in their communities, resets the dominant frameworks deployed to advocate for immigrant justice. By naming the waves of political trauma Khmer refugees in the United States experience, the KGA youth offer strategies that weld together gender justice, refugee justice and youth justice from an anti-carceral and anti-deportation perspective.

Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way

Co-sponsored by the Center for Race and Gender.


 

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