Events

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See our past events.

Many of our events are video-recorded. You can see a list of available videos on our website. If you subscribe to the ISSI YouTube channel, you will be notified when new videos are available.


Fall 2020

Check back here for more information about Fall 2020 events


Friday, September 11 | 2:00-4:00pm PT

Race, The Power of an Illusion is an award-winning three-part docuseries that provides a comprehensive and nuanced view of the history and uses of race throughout time. More relevant now than ever, the first event in this series, The Difference Between Us (Part I), will consist of a one-hour film screening followed by a one-hour panel discussion and will attempt to answer one foundational question: is race biological or social?

Part II (September 25) will cover the roots of race and racism in America, as well as how race is used to naturalize inequality. Part III (October 9th) will examine intersections of race with social institutions, power, wealth, and status. More details are available at https://www.racepowerofanillusion.org/events/ and the events will be livestreamed at the same url.

Sponsored by Othering & Belonging Institute

Co-Sponsored by Center for Research on Social Change and School of Public Health


Thursday, September 24 | 12:00pm - 1:30pm PT

The Black Shoals: Offshore Formations of Black and Native Studies

Zoom Webinar | Register here (free)

Tiffany King, Associate Professor, African-American Studies and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Georgia State University

In her recent book The Black Shoals: Offshore Formations of Black and Native Studies, Tiffany Lethabo King uses the shoal—an offshore geologic formation that is neither land nor sea—as metaphor, mode of critique, and methodology to theorize the encounter between Black studies and Native studies. King conceptualizes the shoal as a space where Black and Native literary traditions, politics, theory, critique, and art meet in productive, shifting, and contentious ways. These interactions, which often foreground Black and Native discourses of conquest and critiques of humanism, offer alternative insights into understanding how slavery, anti-Blackness, and Indigenous genocide structure white supremacy. Among texts and topics, King examines eighteenth-century British mappings of humanness, Nativeness, and Blackness; Black feminist depictions of Black and Native erotics; Black fungibility as a critique of discourses of labor exploitation; and Black art that rewrites conceptions of the human. In outlining the convergences and disjunctions between Black and Native thought and aesthetics, King identifies the potential to create new epistemologies, lines of critical inquiry, and creative practices.

Sponsored by Center for Research on Social Change

Co-sponsored by Joseph A. Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, African American and African Diaspora Studies, Native American Studies


Friday, September 25 | 1:00-3:00pm PT

Race, The Power of an Illusion is an award-winning three-part docuseries that provides a comprehensive and nuanced view of the history and uses of race throughout time. More relevant now than ever, the second event in this series, The Story We Tell (Part I), will consist of a one-hour film screening followed by a one-hour panel discussion and will cover the roots of race and racism in America, as well as how race is used to naturalize inequality. Part III (October 9th) will examine intersections of race with social institutions, power, wealth, and status. More details are available at https://www.racepowerofanillusion.org/events/ and the events will be livestreamed at the same url.

Sponsored by Othering & Belonging Institute

Co-Sponsored by Center for Research on Social Change and School of Public Health


Monday, October 5 | 12:45pm - 2:00pm PT

New Perspectives on Reforming the Criminal Justice System

Zoom Webinar | Register here (free)

Osagie Obasogie, Professor of Bioethics, UCB-UCSF Joint Medical Program; Haas Distinguished Chair, UC Berkeley School of Public Health
Nikki Jones, Associate Professor of African American Studies, UC Berkeley
Stephanie Campos-Bui, Clinical Supervising Attorney, Policy Advocacy Clinic at Berkeley Law
 
Sponsored by Center for the Study of Law and Society

Co-sponsored by Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, Center for Race and Gender, & Center for Research on Social Change


Monday, November 9 | 12:45pm - 2:00pm PT

“The State from Below: Democracy and Citizenship in Policed Communities”

Zoom Webinar | link coming soon

Vesla Weaver, Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology, Johns Hopkins University
 
Sponsored by Center for the Study of Law and Society

Co-sponsored by Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, Institute of Governmental Studies, & Center for Research on Social Change


Friday, November 13 | 12:00pm - 1:30pm PT

Empirics of Justice: Tracking the Carceral Continuum in Urban America

Zoom Webinar | Register here (free)

Carla Shedd, Associate Professor, Urban Education & Sociology, The Graduate Center, City University of New York
 
Carla Shedd will present a lecture based on her new book project, When Protection and Punishment Collide: America’s Juvenile Court System and the Carceral Continuum. The project draws on empirical data to interrogate the deftly intertwined contexts of New York City schools, neighborhoods, and juvenile justice courts, in this dynamic moment of NYC public policy shifts (e.g., school segregation, “Raise the Age,” and “Close Rikers.”).

Sponsored by Center for Research on Social Change

Co-sponsored by Graduate School of Education, Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, Center for Race and Gender, Center for the Study of Law and Society, UC Berkeley


 

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