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See our past events.

Many of our events are video-recorded. You can see a list of available videos on our website. If you subscribe to the ISSI YouTube channel, you will be notified when new videos are available.


SPRING 2019 


February


Wednesday, February 6 | 4 - 6pm

Intersectional Histories, Overdetermined Fortunes: Understanding Mexican and US Domestic Worker Movements

Chris Tilly, Professor of Urban Planning, UCLA

What determines whether movements of informal workers succeed or fail? Using cases of domestic-worker movements in Mexico and the United States, Tilly seeks to  build upon the literature on social movements and intersectionality by adding historical analysis of the movements’ evolution through a cross-national analysis of movement differences. Historically, these two movements have been propelled by multiple streams of activism corresponding to shifting salient intersectional identities and frames, always including gender but incorporating other elements as well. Comparatively, the US domestic-worker movement recently has had greater success due to superior financial resources and greater political opportunities – advantages due in part precisely to intersectional identities resonant with potential allies. However, this relative advantage was not always present and may not persist. By comparing the historical changes and cross-national contrasts between these two movements, Tilly draws greater conclusions about informal-worker organizing and its potential for social change.

IRLE Director's Room, 2521 Channing Way

Sponsored by: Institute for the Research on Labor and Employment (IRLE)

Co-sponsored by: Center for Research on Social Change, UC Berkeley Center for Latin American Studies,  Center for the Study of Law and Society, and Sociology Department.


Wednesday, February 20 - Friday, February 22 

Anti-Black State Violence in Brazil and the U.S: The Power and Struggles of Transnational Movements Across the Americas

Cat Brooks, Anti Police-Terror Project
Ericka Huggins, Black Panther Party
Vilma Reis, Movimento de Mulheres Negras
Alicia Garza, Black Lives Matter
Asha Ransby-Sporn, Black Youth Project 100
Djamila Ribeiro, Movimento de Feministas Negras
Andreia Beatriz & Hamilton Borges dos Santos, Reaja ou Será Mort
Christen Smith, UT Austin
Tina Sacks, Leigh Raiford & John A. Powell, UC Berkeley
Camila de Moraes and more.

At a pivotal historical moment, this symposium will bring further attention to anti-black state violence in the Americas. The University of California, Berkeley will host some of the most influential social movement leaders from Brazil and the United States—homes to the two largest Black populations outside the continent of Africa.

As the U.S. enters a contentious new congressional term and Brazil’s far-right presidential leader comes to power, this symposium will facilitate transnational dialogue, learning, and coalitions. Taking place over three days, we will engage with scholars, scholar-activists, and organizers from Brazil’s Black Movement (Movimento Negro), Black Women’s Movement (Movimento de Mulheres Negras), and the U.S. who have made critical interventions in the areas of law, politics, education, health, and cultural production. Through discussions, workshops and presentations, we will engage with the power and challenges of addressing anti-black state violence through political action and scholarship from three vantage points: the historical foundations of Black struggle, today’s socio-cultural and democratic political contexts, and future pathways to contesting racialized forms of violence.

This symposium will generate fruitful pathways for moving toward inter-disciplinary research on ethno-racial inequality, the African Diaspora in the Americas and histories of Black struggle, state violence, law and democracy, social movements, gender politics, education, and public health, among other areas.

RSVP for individuals events and workshops.

Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Multicultural Center, Room 220

Sponsored by: Departments of African American Studies and Sociology, University of California, Berkeley

Co-sponsored by: Center for Research on Social Change, The Latinx Research Center


Tuesday, February 26 | 3-4:30pm

Immigrant Sanctuary as the “Old Normal”: A Brief History of Police Federalism

Trevor Gardner, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Washington with Franklin E. Zimring, William G. Simon Professor of Law, UC Berkeley as respondant

Three successive presidential administrations have opposed the practice of immigrant sanctuary, at various intervals characterizing state and local government restrictions on police participation in federal immigration enforcement as reckless, aberrant, and unpatriotic. This Article finds these claims to be ahistorical in light of the long and singular history of a field the Article identifies as “police federalism.” For nearly all of U.S. history, Americans within and outside of the political and juridical fields flatly rejected federal policies that would make state and local police subordinate to the federal executive. Drawing from Bourdieusian social theory, the Article conceptualizes the sentiment driving this longstanding opposition as the orthodoxy of police autonomy. It explains how the orthodoxy guided the field of police federalism for more than two centuries, surviving the War on Alcohol, the War on Crime, and even the opening stages of the War on Terror. In constructing a cultural and legal history of police federalism, the Article provides analytical leverage by which to assess the merits of immigrant sanctuary policy as well as the growing body of prescriptive legal scholarship tending to normalize the federal government’s contemporary use of state and local police as federal proxies. More abstractly, police federalism serves as an original theoretical framework clarifying the structure of police governance within the federalist system.

Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way

Sponsored by: ISSI Graduate Fellows Program

Co-sponsored by: Center for Research on Social Change, Department of Sociology, Center for the Study of Law and Society, and the Center for Race and Gender


March


Tuesday, March 12 I 4:00-5:30pm

ISSI Graduate Fellows Program Colloquia:

When Did Black Americans Lose their Indigeneity?: Antiblackness, Indigenous Erasure, and the Future of Black-Indigenous Relations on Turtle Island

Kyle T. Mays (Black/Saginaw Anishinaabe), Assistant Professor, Department of African American Studies & the American Indian Studies Center, UCLA

This talk will analyze moments of solidarity between Black and Indigenous peoples throughout U.S. history. It will also argue for a new way of thinking and talking about people of African descent on Turtle Island, and how this might look going forward.

Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way

Sponsored by: ISSI Graduate Fellows Program

Co-sponsored by: Joseph Myers Center for Research on Native American Issues, Center for Research on Social Change, American Indian Graduate Student Association, American Indian Graduate Program, Native American Studies, Native American Student Development


Tuesday, March 19 | 12-1:30pm

Center for Research on Social Change Colloquia series presents:

The Uncivil Polity: Race, Poverty and Civil Legal Justice

Jamila Michener, Assistant Professor, Department of Government, Cornell University

Civil legal institutions protect crucial economic, social, and political rights. The core functions of civil law include preventing evictions, averting deportations, advocating on behalf of public assistance beneficiaries, representing borrowers in disputes with lenders, safeguarding women from domestic violence, and resolving family disputes (e.g. child support, custody). Civil legal protections are especially critical to low-income women of color. In 2016, seventy-two percent of civil legal aid beneficiaries were women and over 50 percent were people of color. To date, civil legal institutions have remained largely invisible in the discipline of political science. This paper investigates the democratic repercussions of civil legal institutions. Drawing on data from in-depth qualitative interviews, we examine how experiences with civil legal processes affect political attitudes and action among racially and economically marginal denizens.

Wildavsky Conference Room, 2538 Channing Way

Co-sponsored by: Institute for Governmental Studies, the Department of Political Science, and the Berkeley Institute for the Future of Young Americans


April


Tuesday, April 2 I 4 -5:30pm

Cultural Capital, Systemic Exclusion and Bias in the Lives of Black Middle-Class Women: A Conversation

Dawn Marie Dow, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Maryland, College Park, and Tina K. Sacks, Assistant Professor of Social Welfare, UC Berkeley, with moderator Amani Allen, Associate Professor of Public Health, UC Berkeley

At this interactive event, Dawn Dow and Tina Sacks will discuss their new books on African American women. Dow’s book, Mothering While Black: Boundaries and Burdens of Middle-Class Parenthood (UC Press 2019), examines the complex lives of the African American middle class—in particular, black mothers and the strategies they use to raise their children to maintain class status while simultaneously defining and protecting their children’s “authentically black” identities. The book reveals the painful truth of the decisions that black mothers must make to ensure the safety, well-being, and future prospects of their children. In her book Invisible Visits: Black Middle Class Women in the American Healthcare System (Oxford University Press 2019), Sacks challenges the idea that race and gender discrimination-particularly in healthcare settings-is a thing of the past and questions the persistent myth that discrimination only affects poor racial minorities. She argues that simply providing more cultural-competency or anti-bias training to doctors will not be enough to overcome the problem. Rather than lecture, Dow and Sacks will serve as each other’s interlocutors, as well as engage with the audience, as they center the experiences of middle class African American women.

Toll Room, Alumni House

Sponsored by: Center for Research on Social Change and Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society

Co-sponsored by: Gender and Women's Studies, American Cultures Center, Townsend Center, Sociology, Center for Race and Gender, School of Social Welfare


 

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