Events

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Many of our events are video-recorded. You can see a list of available videos on our website. If you subscribe to the ISSI YouTube channel, you will be notified when new videos are available.


Fall 2019


Tuesday, September 10 I 12:30-2:00pm

Center for Research on Social Change Colloquia Series:

Legal Passing: Navigating Undocumented Life and Local Immigration Law

Angela S. Garcia, Assistant Professor, School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago

This book talk analyzes the ways federal, state, and local immigration laws shape the lives of undocumented Mexicans in the US. Comparing restrictive and accommodating immigration measures in various cities and states, it shows that place-based inclusion and exclusion unfold for immigrants in seemingly contradictory ways. Instead of erasing undocumented residents from the community, increased threat from restrictive localities creates conditions for immigrants to subvert the public gaze by “legal passing,” or attempting to mask the stigma of illegality to avoid police and immigration enforcement. As legal passing becomes embodied, immigrants distance themselves from their ethnic and cultural identities, resulting in coerced assimilation. In accommodating localities, undocumented Mexicans experience a sense of local membership and stability that is simultaneously undercut by federal deportation threat and complex street-level tensions with police. Combining social theory on immigration and law as well as place and race, the talk illuminates the human consequences of contemporary immigration federalism.

Shorb House (Latinx Research Center), 2547 Channing Way

Co-sponsored by the Latinx Research Center, Center for the Study of Law and Society, Berkeley Interdisciplinary Migration Initiative


Thursday, September 26 I 3:30-4:30pm

Center for Research on Social Change Colloquia Series:

Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement

Monica White, Associate Professor of Environmental Justice, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Freedom Farmers: Agricultural Resistance and the Black Freedom Movement revises the historical narrative of African American resistance and breaks new ground by including the work, roles, and contributions of southern Black farmers and the organizations they formed. The book traces the origins of Black farmers’ organizations to the late 1800s, emphasizing their activities during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Whereas much of the existing scholarship views agriculture as a site of oppression and exploitation of Black people, Freedom Farmers reveals agriculture also as a site of resistance by concentrating on the work of Black farm operators and laborers who fought for the right to participate in the food system as producers and to earn a living wage in the face of racially, socially, and politically repressive conditions. Moreover, it provides an historical foundation that will add meaning and context for current conversations regarding the resurgence of agriculture in the context of food justice/sovereignty movements in urban spaces like Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, New York City, and New Orleans.

132 Mulford Hall, UC Berkeley

Co-sponsored by Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, College of Natural Resources; Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management; Berkeley Food Institute

This event will be followed by a reception.


Wednesday, October 23 I 4:00-5:30pm

Center for Research on Social Change is pleased to co-sponsor:

In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Food Legacy in the Atlantic World

Judith Carney, Professor of Geography, UCLA

A striking feature of plantation era history is the number of first-person accounts that credit the enslaved with the introduction of specific foods, all previously grown in Africa. This lecture lends support to these observations by identifying the crops that European witnesses attributed to slave agency and by engaging the ways that African subsistence staples arrived, and became established, in the Americas. In emphasizing the African crop transfers that occurred between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, the discussion draws attention to the significance of the continent’s food crops as a crucial underpinning of the transatlantic commerce in human beings, the slave ship as a means of conveying African crops to the Americas, and the enslaved as active participants in establishing African foodstaples on their subsistence plots and in the foodways of former plantation societies.

International House, Chevron Auditorium, 2299 Piedmont Avenue, Berkeley

Sponsored by the Department of Geography


 

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